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(Created page with "Hey. I'm not sure what commas you are referring to, but we do that in the states sometimes, too, like, "his ugly, rotten tooth." One isn't needed between big and old in "big ...")
 
 
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Hey. I'm not sure what commas you are referring to, but we do that in the states sometimes, too, like, "his ugly, rotten tooth." One isn't needed between big and old in "big old man," though. I'm not sure why that is. I guess "big old man" is just a cliche phrase or description we all have heard.  
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Hey. I'm not sure what commas you are referring to, but we do that in the States sometimes, too, like, "his ugly, rotten tooth." One isn't needed between big and old in "big old man," though. I'm not sure why that is. I guess "big old man" is just a cliche phrase or description we all have heard.  
   
 
The reason I reversed your edits wasn't because you removed the word "big," but because your edit created a new grammar mistake.
 
The reason I reversed your edits wasn't because you removed the word "big," but because your edit created a new grammar mistake.
   
"He wears old-fashioned square glasses (the glasses for some reason were absent when Jonathan was seen on the cover of The Horror at Chiller House), '''as well as having a gold tooth'''.
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"He wears old-fashioned square glasses (the glasses for some reason were absent when Jonathan was seen on the cover of The Horror at Chiller House), '''as well as having a gold tooth'''."
   
 
That latter bit just sounded awkward, and I went to correct it and make that part its own sentence, but then I noticed that it was already its own sentence before you edited it and you moved the sentence. I didn't know if you thought "big old man" was bad grammar, either. It was just easier to undo the edit. 
 
That latter bit just sounded awkward, and I went to correct it and make that part its own sentence, but then I noticed that it was already its own sentence before you edited it and you moved the sentence. I didn't know if you thought "big old man" was bad grammar, either. It was just easier to undo the edit. 

Latest revision as of 21:02, August 5, 2018

Hey. I'm not sure what commas you are referring to, but we do that in the States sometimes, too, like, "his ugly, rotten tooth." One isn't needed between big and old in "big old man," though. I'm not sure why that is. I guess "big old man" is just a cliche phrase or description we all have heard.  

The reason I reversed your edits wasn't because you removed the word "big," but because your edit created a new grammar mistake.

"He wears old-fashioned square glasses (the glasses for some reason were absent when Jonathan was seen on the cover of The Horror at Chiller House), as well as having a gold tooth."

That latter bit just sounded awkward, and I went to correct it and make that part its own sentence, but then I noticed that it was already its own sentence before you edited it and you moved the sentence. I didn't know if you thought "big old man" was bad grammar, either. It was just easier to undo the edit. 

You were right to split the run-on sentence, though, so I did fix that back and credited you. 

I hope I didn't offend you! If Jonathan Chiller is not described in the book as big, feel free to remove that again. I'm not super familiar with the book or character (haven't made it that far yet), but from your edit notes, you were correcting grammar, not content issues, so I thought maybe you thought "big old man" was incorrect grammar, which it is not.

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