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  • If you are saying someone is twelve years old, you don't use hyphens. If you're calling someone a twelve-year-old, you do.

    (Also, I use em-dashes in place of commas when the sentence already contains commas elsewhere. It's just easier to visually understand.)

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    • Okay, thanks! 

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    • I've seen it used as a noun/adjective so much. Like, "She is Italian." "She is twelve-years-old." I understand what you're saying though, and I just googled, and both ways are right, so I'm fine with whatever you want to do.

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    • >Use hyphens for ages expressed as adjectives before a noun or as substitutes for a noun.

      https://writingexplained.org/years-old-hyphenate

      >She is twelve-years-old.

      Pretty sure that's not right.

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    • I'm surprised you -- with your em-dashes -- don't love my dashes. ;)

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    • Those are just --s.

      ————— Em-dash gang rise UP!! —————

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    • Hahahaha. 

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    • As for periods outside the "" marks: it's the hill I'm dying on. Otherwise, you'd end up with sentences like.

      The final story is "What's Cooking?."

      It's technically Britishy to put it outside, but it makes so much more sense. Especially for a series with punctuation regularly in the title. (I even made an exception in the rules for it.)

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    • But I have a grammar question:

      Do you say "straight, black hair" or "straight black hair"? The latter looks nicer, but I've never been sure.

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    • Oh, ok. Thanks for letting me know. You're the admin.

      I think when the title has a punctuation mark in it, you should drop one of them, but I can't remember which one. Like...

      "The final story is "What's Cooking."

      The final story is "What's Cooking?"

      I'm taking a grammar class next semester. I'll ask my professor and report back.

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    • > Do you say "straight, black hair" or "straight black hair"? The latter looks nicer, but I've never been sure.

      It should be "straight, black hair."

      It's about modifying. If both adjectives modify the noun, you need the comma. "ugly, yellow teeth." The teeth are both ugly and yellow, so the comma is needed. "Straight" doesn't describe "black." It describes "hair," so there should be a comma.

      "Dark brown hair" doesn't need a comma because dark modifies brown, and brown modifies hair. Even though the hair is dark, what's being said here is the brown is dark. You can also have "dark, brown hair" because the hair can be dark and brown.

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    • The reason I ask: I think Stine says "straight black hair" in most books.

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    • Like:

      >I have short, straight black hair (Attack of the Jack-o-Whatevers)
      >I have straight black hair (Egg Munsters)
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    • And as we all know, Egg Munsters is literary canon.

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    • I like the article I linked you's trick. If you can put the word "and" between the two adjectives and it makes sense, you should have the comma.

      "I have straight and black hair."

      I wonder what Stine would do if we tweeted him this grammar question.

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    • He would use his mind powers to eviscerate you for your ignorance DON'T DO IT YEERK NO!

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    • We should cut him some slack anyway. I'm pretty dang good at grammar and you've corrected some of mine here. I don't ever take offense because no one can be grammatically correct all the time. There are way too many rules, and they're constantly changing. 

      The things I am hard on people for are run-on sentences, sentence fragments (sentences without verbs), and homophones (they're/their, your/you're, it's/its, to/too/two). Those are all things that never change that we can all learn to use properly.

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    • I mean, I realize "straight black hair" is wrong... But it also looks nicer that the alternative. And all the rules are made up anyways... Just ask R.L. Kerouac.

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    • On the Road (to HorrorLand)

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    • I don't know why but Metallic's "Enter Sandman" just popped in my head and I sang that.

      "Exit light
      Enter night
      Take my hand
      We're off to horror horrorland"

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    • >OXFORD COMMA.

      I see you're adding Oxford commas doing the Lord's work.

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    • I can deal with your puncutation outside quotation marks, but I cannot deal with the lack of that second comma in a list of three things. ;)

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    • Alright, I'll be logging off soon. Until I return, remember the eternal words of R.L. Kerouac:

      Bzzz bzzz bee crazy dumbsaint of the mind.

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    • A FANDOM user
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